Tuesday, January 27, 2015

Blog #67 -Inception - Dreams as Movie Making


Movie - Making.  Inception, as a film, is all a dream (it's been speculated), but it's also an extended metaphor for filmmaker Christopher Nolan.  Like a dream, the movie is a shared dream for the audience and has its own rules and functions along those lines.  Some characters and scenes happen like dreams in which there seems to be no rhyme or reason: Mal comes out of a crowd and stabs Ariadne; the train in the first dream that blasts through downtown where there's no tracks; the elder Fischer's hospital bed in a huge vault inside of a mountain fortress; Cobb squeezing between an amazingly small gap of two buildings.   Mal even makes the case to Cobb at the end that he is in fact still stuck in a dream, with feelings of persecution (the authorities or Cobol's security forces), creeping doubts, and little remembrance of how he got there.   On another thought, the way the dream team works is similar to how a movie is made - they plan the scenes and sets down to the smallest details, always conscious of the audience (the dreamer's projections) and its reaction.  And, the way the movie ends with the cut scene of Cobb's totem and then kicking into the music (Edith Piaf's haunting melody) as the credits roll is kind of like a dream because sometimes we are ripped out of a dream before its ending and we want to know how it ends.  Yet we can't go back.

 -- all of this is controlled by the master manipulator, the director, Christopher Nolan.  Everything in this movie is done for a reason.  In the movie, Cobb is the director, Arthur is the producer who does the research, Ariadne the screenwriter when she acts as the architect, Eames is the actor and Yusuf is the technical guy that makes it all happen.  Saito is the money guy (also a producer) who finances the whole operation and Fischer is the audience who is taken for an exciting adventure by the director, Cobb.  Yet we are also the audience too, since this is a movie/ dream.  Arthur mentions continuously that they cannot mess with the dream too much, otherwise the dreamer knows something is wrong.  The same can be said for movies - when there's too much fakery or interference from the director, we as the audience snap out of the trance that the movie is weaving for us and see the movie for what it is.  We lose ourselves in well-made movies b/c we're not paying attention to the poor acting or screenwriting or plotholes or ridiculous scenes.  We care about the characters and want to see a satisfying resolution.   And so Cobb, as the director, makes an amazing movie / dream, but also brings part of himself into the movie (Mal) which can influence the audience (she shoots Fischer in the 3rd dream).  Most of the jarring scenes in Inception include Mal.  And it's Mal who questions Cobb and raises doubt as to his true purpose. 

 - And since the movie is like a dream, it has planted the idea of itself in the mind of the movie audience as well - is this a movie or was the whole thing a dream?  This is where the movie becomes almost a meta-movie, a movie that is more than just a movie; it is Christopher Nolan dreaming about Cobb. 
 http://www.chud.com/24477/never-wake-up-the-meaning-and-secret-of-inception/

 
Director Christopher Nolan and Leonardo DiCaprio.

You job: Do you think that Inception was just a movie about dreams, or was Christopher Nolan, the director, trying to say something more with it?  If so, what was he trying to say with the film?

250 words total for your response, due Thursday, January 29 by class.  

21 comments:

  1. I really like the idea of moviemaking beings similar to the characters' making a dream. Both craft entirely different realities and then place someone in them. Someone who is willing to accept the frame of the situation, as long as it doesn't steer too far from the truth. Many people's biggest pet peeves about movies extend from situations in the movie that deviate too far from the movie reality. You can't criticize a movie for being about time travel, space exploration, or even dreams, but when there are ridiculous inconsistencies, then the space is open up for criticisms. This is also true with the dreams that characters experience during Inception. Although the dreams themselves are far fetched, everything within the dream must follow the rules or reality of that specific dream or else the dreamer gets suspicious. For example, it's ok that for whatever reason the dreams take place on a snowy mountain or a cityscape, even though that may not make logical sense, but if a surfer in bathing suit shorts comes out in the middle of a winter scene, then it becomes unrealistic although the reality the dreamer has created is inherently unrealistic in itself. Moreover, the team creates the dream in Inception similar to the way Christopher Nolan and his team creates a movie. In this analogy I think Adrianne is in charge of setting, costume, makeup, everything they need to create an illusion of an entirely different world, Cobb is the director, creating a plan for every scene and carefully outlining each person's role, I agree Yusuf is an actor as he plays the part of Fischer's uncle, although I would argue that Arthur is the director's assistant who gathers information and helps Cobb get all the information he needs to put on a successful show. However, there is one key flaw in the movie analogy. Instead of the dream making being like putting on a movie, it is more like a play. There are no retakes in a play.

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  2. Grace MacDonald
    Whatever happened during the movie Inception happened for a reason. Director Nolan and the producers of Inception were strategic with their details, like the Inception team was. Ariadne and Cobb, when they travelled in the first dream, were able to respectively change and experience the dream Ariadne created, like directors of movies. Like a dream in real life, the dreamer can change what happens and the world he/she is in. Ariadne could have had harsh feelings toward Mal and Cobb’s situation and changed the situation very quickly which led to her projections turning. It could have been her subconscious talking; Ariadne could have grudges against people that caused the hostility. Making a movie out of a dream can emphasize the reality of the dream and show what dreams are really like. As I said before, the producers set things for a reason. The safe in the fortress could represent the young Fischer’s feelings as having a hard time of letting go of his father and keeping him safe. This was a movie that Cobb dreamt. It could have been all in Cobb’s head and he dreamt they went into young Fischer’s mind; Cobb could’ve just happened to sit behind Fischer on the plane with his comrades. When Mal shot Fischer, we saw a mix between reality and the dream world. Cobb somehow intervened with Fischer’s dream to create Mal’s presence in the fortress. Dreams, like movie-making, can be changed at any time by the dreamer or the director. Inception relates so close to movie making in a sense of the pliability of the world the dreamer or director creates. This is a movie, but most parts in it were not reality. Dreams inside of dreams get complicated, but everything from when Cobb ‘fell asleep’ on the plane until the end of the movie was a dream. Maybe Cobb and his team didn’t really go into Fischer’s mind after all.

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  3. It is true that Inception has many metaphors about film and cinema. Like dreams, movies can be quite surreal, allowing the viewer to be fooled by many things within the movie. For example, the set of inception was most likely not actually filmed in Mombasa, rather somewhere easier. We see a set piece and believe that it’s real, that it’s not just a prop. Connected to film making is that the roles of each person is highly valued- each team member is important to the production (However, I would argue that Arthur is the true producer in all this. He doesn’t have the money but he makes sure everything runs smoothly and comes up with the plans). The cast as well allow us to use an open mind, believing that the man on the screen is Cobb who is wanted for murder rather than Leonardo De Caprio, or the woman working with him is just a college student when it’s really Ellen Page. Both these people are well known, so why do we get ‘fooled’ by movies when we see them on the screen, automatically believing that they are who they say they are? Well, we WANT to be fooled, after all it’s a movie. We come here to ‘dream’, escape into limbo and believe for an hour or two that this is the reality. Inception is telling the audience the truth, that this world is not real, it’s only a dream. But is that so bad? Rather, why wouldn't you want to escape into such a world? It is pure creation.

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  4. Inception might be my favorite movie ever. When I saw it in this class, that was the third or fourth time I have seen it. And I do think that Christopher Nolan has performed a sort of Inception on my mind. After telling myself every time after watching the movie "It's ok, it's reality" over and over, there is this small question that has kind of lingered and grown the more times I have watched the movie. "Is Cobb actually dreaming at the end?"

    The dream levels in Inception are similar to my viewings of the movie. The first level, my first time watching the movie, was not deep enough to plant the idea. Because I didn't have a deep enough understanding of what happened, so I assumed that Cobb was in reality and that everything was fine. But after seeing it more and more, understanding all the little nuances and being able to rattle off quotes like they were the names of my family members, this tiny idea has grown and grown. Once Cobb picked up his totem while seeing Yusuf, we didn't know anymore. I still think he was in reality at the end, (his kids were bigger and the top was wobbling) but like being woken up from a dream, we will never know for sure (unless they make a sequel, and I don't think that would be the best idea).

    If it was Christopher Nolan's idea, to give the viewer this sort of reaction at the end, it's nothing short of genius. Like Cobb, he had to map out everything to the last little detail, make sure it was deep enough, and have the perfect sequence of events. Also like Cobb, I think he succeeded.

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  5. I believe that inception was indeed all a dream. The “reality” of the movie is unrealistic and unexplainable. Cobb uses a totem to let him know if he is actually awake or dreaming. Mal was the one who used the totem to began with but still believed that they were stuck in a dream when the totem fell. When Mal killed herself, she was on a ledge, opposite of the room they had rented. In the article the writer proposes that a more realistic notion is that it is a dream. He believes that the gap between the lovers was a metaphorical dream made literal, which I totally agree with. Another clue that insures us that Cobb is dreaming throughout the entire movie is in the end of the movie when Cobb returns home and sees his kids, they were in the exact position and wearing the exact same clothes that he kept remembering. People might argue the point that Cobb’s son looks older but he could also be dreaming of his kids looking older when he finally got to see them after a few years. In the end, it doesn’t matter if Cobb’s totem falls. I believe that he was dreaming. I personally think that believing the whole movie is one dream Cobb had makes it more realistic, therefore more meaningful. If the parts of the movie that were intended to be “reality” was actually reality, I would be puzzled. I don’t believe that it is possible to plant ideas inside of peoples minds while they are dreaming and make them believe that it is real when they return to reality. Therefore, I could say that I sided with Mal.

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  6. Okay, I see how the people creating the movie (director, screenwriter, technical producer) are all part of the "dream" being created for the audience. If the movie is cliche or the special effects are cheesy we, the audience, realize and are no longer as enveloped in the production. The movie doesn't have the same effect you could say. This symbolizes during inception when Cobb and the team enter into young Fischer's dream they have to keep it as realistic as possible or his conscience will recognize that it's not a dream and the mission will fail. I guess I agree with the metaphor that a dream is like the movie making process. I think this applies to every movie that has made me cry. Beasts of the Southern Wild, while not as realistic, had intense metaphors which drew me in and kept me intently watching until the end. The final scene was both summarizing what the main character had learned while leaving her with an uncertain future, like in a dream. It's all about creating a reality, and sticking to the rules that have been created within it. Like in Beasts of the Southern Wild, there were large buffalos that she was afraid of, while it wouldn't make any sense in our world, it does in theirs and that's what makes it so realistic. So when Cobb is able to get through tight buildings and Fischer's hospital bed inside of a vault, it's not that it's so realistic that makes it believable, it's that it is possible in their reality and is consistent with those new laws created within it.

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  7. I feel like I were to be the guy who said that the movie just some well written movie about dreams I wouldn't have enough to write about, but that's okay because there is still plenty to talk about with the idea that the movie was a metaphor for the movie making/viewing process. Coming from absolutely zero movie making experience I cannot really speak on the matter because of you know empiricism and all. So as a viewer I can say that it seemed to me that what Christopher Nolan was trying to convey in the movie was that like dreams movies can be easily identified through inconsistency. When you are totally aware of a dream it can be either really fun (lucid dreaming) or can make you wanna wake up. A movie has the same effect, if you're watching a movie and something crazy happens big whoop its a movie but at the same time depending on your state of mind a crazy inconsistency can take you out of the serious movie zone and put you right back on your couch. Noticing things like terrible acting and plot holes can make a movie viewer remove himself from the scene and its a little like looking left or right during one of those cheesy simulation rides at Disney World. I think soarin is what its called. Anywho the ending of inception was one helluva cliff hanger and I have had some dreams like that as well where you wake up like right before meeting Dwayne the Rock Johnson at his house after spending the whole first 5 hours of the dream getting to his house.

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  8. I thought the movie was confusing enough with out the idea that the entire movie is a dream or an extended metaphor for film making. I can see how there are aspects of film making in the plot and the characters especially when thinking about what “role” the characters played (Cobb as the director, Arthur as the producer etc.). I also agree with the fact that a well-made movie is similar to a dream. Sometimes we get so involved in the story line and the characters that we forget for a couple minutes that it is all fictional. The same thing could be said about reading a novel. I get really involved and attached to the characters inside a book. I start reading a good book and I get so attached to the characters that I literally don’t put the book down for hours and when I finish it kind of feels like waking up. Books and movies can definitely put ideas into your head. I know this happens to me all the time. I sometimes get inspired to write or I get a new idea after watching an excellent movie or reading a great book. I think it is possible that Cobb was still dreaming in the end when he finally got to see his kids because it didn't really make sense how he got there which is a sign that you are in a dream. I think it’s possible Cobb could be in a dream the entire movie. When Mal (who is really Cobb’s own subconscious) points out to Cobb the unrealistic things that happen in his life like how he is being persecuted. I do think it’s possible that the whole movie was Cobb’s dream but it doesn't make sense to say that it was all Christopher Nolan’s dream. I sat this partially because I’m not sure I really understand this. What exactly is a meta-movie?

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  9. I think that the idea of the movie inception was just a movie and the directors had no hidden meaning to the movie. I don’t think that it would in any way be possible to enter someone’s mind and be able to extract memories or ideas from inside someone’s dreams unless they were under hypnosis or any other logical form. If there was I don’t think that the machine would be able to work by being hooked up to their arm. Although if he was trying to say something I think that he was just trying to make the viewer of the movie think about if the reality we perceive around us is actually the reality we live in. Is this reality we think we live in our actual reality or is it just on big dream and we’re stuck in limbo? I think the world I perceive myself being in is actually the world I’m in. The movie was just a cool idea dreamt up by the director.

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  10. I missed the beginning so I do not know how it started but I do know the middle and the end and it was beyond unrealistic. Dreams are a gift. Dreams give us the ability to control the outcome of any obstacle we face. It gives us a sense of a utopia in our mind, a perfect world, a perfect setting and script to whatever we are dreaming. The whole movie was a dream but Christopher Nolan, the director, was sending a message beyond the movie and that is that the unconscious mind is powerful and so are dreams. I feel that dreams are the unconscious mind coming out. The body is sleeping and the brain is resting and the conscious mind is suppressed and boom, the unconscious mind is there and we dream what we feel and want way, way deep down. But in the actual movie, I do not think that it is reality. I think that a totem cannot tell you what is real and what is fake because how do you know the totem is real. In the ending, the totem appeared to be tipping over, but regardless if it was or was not, Cobb was reunited with his children. That was Cobb's motivation and his goal and he achieved that. The team also achieved what they set out to do in getting Fischer, unconsciously, to break up his father's empire. I believe that Cobb awoke on the plane and really did not know any of the people he thought he did. He saw them on the plane, imagined them, came home, and his kids looked older. In the limbo stage, Cobb and Mal did not age over fifty years. His kids aged over the apparent two years he was away from them. So I guess I do not really know. I know that what Cobb and his team did is not real and impossible but I believe he was away from his kids and Mal committed suicide. It was mind trippy.

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  11. After watching Inception, I believe the director Christopher Nolan was aiming to show his audience that this creation is more than just a movie about dreams. The true craftsmanship and impeccable detail, down to the tee, is perfection and can be attributed to not only the leadership by Nolan, but also passion, common understanding, and collaboration among the leading actors and Nolan. All coincided to dramatize a complex film that captured all the elements of dreams – unexplainable actions or situations, actions occurring that seem to be impossible in reality, and the feeling of being a dual participant-spectator of the dream, to name a few. I think Nolan’s precision and the casting directors’ success together built the ultimate dream for us as audience members. It’s hard to peg what Nolan wanted to define with saying that this is “more than a movie about dreams” because the rationalization can be interpreted in different ways. I primarily think Nolan wanted to inspire his audience with the abrupt ending to the dream/movie, leaving us without assurance as to Cobb ended up in reality or in another level of a never-ending dream. I personally think he wanted to show his audience that we need to not let the world define us, as Cobb previously had by running away from his false accusation of killing Mal; instead, we should follow our dreams and let dreams take us to a better tomorrow, allowing “dreams to become our reality”. Cobb dreamt of being reunited with his children again in the real world, so he completed the necessary work in order to attain passage to his dream-reality.
    Jenna Weed

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  12. I think the movie Inception could have many different interpretations and view points just depending on the actual watcher. To some it might be just another great Hollywood premise that turned into a movie that required too much in depth thinking. Personally however, I think the movie was too detailed and well thought out for that to be the extant of it and I think the ideas of the movie went far deeper than perhaps most of us could notice or comprehend. The way my 17-year-old high school student brain saw it was as kind of a warning and a way of bringing into light how caught up in fantasies and ideals that humans can get. I think especially that was the whole idea of getting caught in limbo. When you focus too much on what’s coming and the future ahead you can get lost in that and never stop to appreciate the moments happening around you and the current state you’re in. I also think the whole situation with Cobb not being able to dream any more gets caught up in this. He was so focused on dreaming and inception that it stifled his natural creativity and his natural curiosity. I also think a big idea this movie touched on was the idea of letting go of painful memories and not letting them haunt you. Situations that you didn’t mean to happen or were beyond your control, yeah they suck but you can’t live your whole life like Cobb suppressing the memory and letting it affect you in almost every aspect of your life. I believe an overall message that can be pulled from the film is to appreciate everyday life and the small things and also to let things go and move on from them.

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  13. I thought a lot about if the entire movie (from start to credits) was a dream, but I truthfully do not see that happening at all. I believe that the movie was about dreams. For instance, when we all drea, sometimes unexpected things happen. I once had a dream where I was eating ice cream with a friend and the Earth beneath us suddenly crumbled and I fell to my death. That was totally random, and very unrealistic, like Mal stabbing Ariadne or Cobb squeezing through the wall. My theory of the movie is that while they were all trying to complete the mission, reality gets a bit messed up. By the end of the movie it seems like we don’t really know what happens and if it is a reality or not. What I did notice was that Cobb after he spins the totem, walks away and does not seem to care about it. That struck me oddly, because through the whole movie he was obsessed with it, but when he sees both of his children, he seems to be content or satisfied with whatever “reality” he is in. This movie was made quite nicely, because Christopher Nolan probably wanted people to have all of these other theories about the movie. I truthfully think that it was not reality in the end, but the whole movie does have many “dream like” moments. It just does not fully add up how Cobb gets to his family through the complete mission, and I think it was not quite supposed to be a dream within itself, but that Nolan clearly wanted many “fictional” dream-like things to happen.

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    1. Good point,Morgan. Never thought of how obsessed Cobb was with reality and how quickly he walked away from the spinning top.

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  14. I’m still unsure of my feelings towards Inception. I think there is something deeper than just dreams that Christopher Nolan is trying to say with this film, but I’m not sure what that thing is. Maybe it’s something along the lines of society and how it influences us. For example, going back to one of our first discussions in class, is beauty universal? Can society’s image of beauty define our image? I think that’s sort of what Nolan is getting at. We let something bigger than us invade our thoughts and change how we perceive things, not just with beauty but with thins such as happiness, intelligence, wealth, love, and so on. In this film the thing “bigger than us” was Cobb and his team, they invaded Fischer’s thoughts by planting ideas in his dreams, changing how he perceived his role in his father’s community. I have yet to come to a conclusion on whether or not I think this whole movie was a dream. We never see the totem stop spinning because it fell in the bathroom, and then the movie cuts at the end before ever showing us whether or not it stops spinning. I do think the totem will stop spinning at the end of the movie once it cuts. Or at least I would like to think that. It just makes sense because the kids are a little bit older and what not.

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  15. I think that Nolan made this movie to say how movies are made and how dreams work. I personally have been in a dream with a certain setting and background and all of a sudden its changed. Cobb's top leaves you wondering if it actually was reality or not. Maybe that whole time he was dreaming. Nolan has some weird scenes happen though (Cobb through the tight wall and the bed in the vault) but if it was a all a dream then it is very possible that Cobb could have dreamed his situation or it was Fisher dreaming. I do agree that each person has their own role in the dreams, especially Ariadne, because she has to design each level of the dream.
    I think Christopher Nolan is one of the best directors around but when it comes to Inception I just get confused really easily. It has nothing to do with Nolan, but I own this movie and have probably seen it 10-15 times and I swear it changes each time. I'm not sure if that is intended or not.
    I like the concept of the movie and how they can go and manipulate people's mind through their dreams. Fisher is pushed into splitting up his dad's company because of the Inception team, which I think is very cool.

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    1. I find something new every time I watch this movie.

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  16. I believe that the movie was a movie and his reality was when he was on the plane and made a deal with Saito and then at the end when he was able to see his kids again when they were older. I think that his kids could only be older through reality because when he and Mal were in limbo for fifty years although the movie said that they had aged and that was "their time together" it said nothing about their kids aging, because they were in limbo but their kids were not. So the kids that they had in limbo were just projections of the last time that they had seen their children and they had seen their children young so that it the only projection that their subconscious could create and so even when they were old their kids were the same age of the last time they'd saw them. I also think that although it was cut away at the end, the pin was going to fall, which would signify that that was reality. I think that the inception that they did on Fischer will work because when it was done on Mal she carried that thought into reality which lead to her killing herself in the real world. I am confused however, about how when she killed herself in reality, if it was reality she ended up back in limbo. I feel like if you kill yourself in the real world, you should just die, for real. I also think that because of the guilt, he was subconsciously sabotaging all of his jobs because he did inception on her wife and cause her to kill herself so he felt like he didn't deserve to have happiness or success. I also think that the architect that he got from the University was like his psychologist that helped him unleash his pain and to face Mal once and for all. I also think that the whole thing was a metaphor, because it showed, that the moral of the story is that they should be happy with their own reality and not have to live through their dreams because that's just sad and it clearly causes tons of problems.

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  17. I don't think that the movie is like the director's dream necessarily because I can't fit all of the characters with real people in my mind in a way that makes sense. I do however think that the idea that the characters within the movie are like the different parts of the movie making process. I never thought of it that way. But I don't think that is the most important thing to discuss. The fact that the top is spinning at the end of the movie before that cut away is the most intriguing thing combined with Cobb never checking if he was awake in that bathrrom scene. I wish I could get my brain organized enough to trace this movie better, when we watched it in class it was my third time seeing it! I always miss something, and the sink scene is definitely a talking point. I think that the idea that the movie ended where it did to simulate a dream because that's actually how it is in real life; you reach the best and most crucial part and it just cuts off abruptly. It's like a book that ends on a cliffhanger.. It made me think- why do we care so much whether or not Cobb was back home in real life? If he could live out his life on whatever level he's on and be happy, does it really matter? Why do we care so much that we're on the "reality" level? What's so special about it? If everything is the same but better in an alternate reality it seems like people would want to just stay there but sadly that isn't the case. Maybe that's what the director was trying to point out, that a seemingly perfect world can still drive you insane.

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  18. Lilly Havis
    I believe that the movie Inception was not just simply a movie about dreams. I think that Christopher Nolan was trying to convey a bigger message with it. I believe that that message is that we can’t live in a fantasy world, just because it’s better than real life. Eventually we have to come back to reality, and the longer we wait, the harder it becomes. I think this is most evidently shown in Mal’s story, how she spent such a long time in limbo with Cobb that the dream land became her reality, and when she really got back to reality, she couldn’t handle it. She had convinced herself that the dream was reality, and that reality was a dream. She ended up killing herself to go back to her fantasy world. I think that things like this happen all of the time in real life. For example, a drug addict is stuck in their own ‘fantasy world’, when they are constantly impaired. The impaired state isn’t reality, but over time it becomes reality for the addict. The longer the addiction goes on for, the more difficult it is for the addict to come back to reality. That’s why a lot of times the addict can’t do it on their own, so they often get help facing reality by going to rehab centers. There are a lot of other real life applications of people wanting to escape reality and struggling to get back. I think the message Christopher Nolan is trying to send is that escaping reality can be okay every once in a while, but any more than that can be dangerous.

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  19. The Hellenistic school of thought I chose was connects with me because I believe in simple joys and pleasures. In my opinion, a lot of problems that we create within our personal lives or within the world as a whole is due to greed. It seems as though many people are always concerned about what's next instead of being okay with where they are. Epicurus “condemned all forms of over-indulgence” which, to me, seems smart in order to live a happy, simple life. When one “over-indulges” on food, for example, they either spend more money than they wanted to in the beginning and/or gain more pounds than they were expecting. Thus, following their meal, the person is now left with a fewer amount of money as well as unwanted weight. It's factors like these that make people unhappy with their life: not enough money, so they blame their job or not liking their body due to the extra pounds they have. Maybe my examples aren't the best, but I feel as though when someone tries to over extend their “simple” boundaries, that's when problems begin to arise. In my life, I feel as though I’m happiest when I don't force anything. What I mean is when I simplify things to a certain degree, life becomes a breeze. For example, think of math; when I’m given a complicated equation with fractions and what not, it's easier to simplify the equation to make it easier to solve. But for life experiences, In the world today, I could see why people would go against Epicureans simply because the world is constantly growing and expanding its new properties. So, this is where I feel as though there could be an exception simply because to Epicurus, a flip phone would be perfectly fine for him to operate in his life. However, with the way technology grows, that flip phone will be outdated within no time. Now I’m not saying that someone has to buy the newest version of everything, but I feel as though a little indulgence in staying with the progression of the century doesn't hurt as long as one isn't always looking for the newest, hottest product out. In a nutshell, I agree with Epicurus in the sense that in order to have a simple life (which is a happy life to most), it’s key to not let yourself over-indulge in unneeded pleasures, but I still believe that a little indulge doesn't hurt anyone.

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